New queen

My purple hive, Demeter, had an open queen cell on June 30th. On July 4th it was capped and I calculated that the virgin should emerge July 11th. I waited 2 weeks before checking for brood just to make sure she had time to mate and I didn’t disturb them too soon. I quickly checked them July 28th and found a frame of capped brood, open brood intermixed with pollen and then approximately 2 frames of eggs and young larvae. I kept looking and looking and found her on the last frame of eggs. I was able to catch her and mark her though the plunger dropped on her rather quickly and I’m worried I maimed her, guess we’ll see. As always, click to enlarge the pictures.

Queen Pamela (it means "sweet" and "honeyed").
Queen Pamela (it means “sweet” and “honeyed”), marked pink.
Queen cups in the upper deep. These are always here, ready to be used if needed. They'll build them, break them down, build them somewhere else. These are in all my hives and yours too, don't panic. Take note if they become elongated, inside you'll find royal jelly which is a milky substance, and larva.
Queen cups in the upper deep. These are always here, ready to be used if needed. They’ll build them, break them down, build them somewhere else. These are in all my hives and yours too, don’t panic. Take note if they become elongated, inside you’ll find royal jelly which is a milky substance, and larva.
Probably one of the most beautiful sights for a beekeeper: worker larvae from a new queen.
Probably one of the most beautiful sights for a beekeeper: worker larvae from a new queen.
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