We all make mistakes

Foolish, foolish woman. I managed to get through 3 hives on Saturday (digging very deeply: marking queens, cleaning propolis and burr comb from frames, etc.) before I had a visitor in my veil that told me I FORGOT TO ZIPPER THE VEIL TO MY JACKET!!! I’ll get to that in a minute. There aren’t many pictures because of that as well.

I was on a mission to clean the frames and make them easier to put back in the hives; cleaning the burr comb off the sides of the topbars helps to prevent any extra bee squishing. The bees neither like to be squished, nor do they like to have their frames scraped. I was asking for it.

We searched through the Aqua hive several times in an effort to find and mark the queen only to discover that she was already MARKED!! The Aqua hive has a 2014 queen. Wrong hive Anna… Then I remembered it was the Pink hive that had a new queen. That took some digging and searching but my hubby found her. It was this hive that reminded me I hadn’t zipped my veil down. I marked the new queens with a bright blue color. I use these pens which are easy to find: http://elmers.com/product/detail/W7571

Nice bright blue, should be easier to find her now. I prefer my queens marked because it lets me know whether the queen has been replaced.

Nice bright blue, should be easier to find her now. I prefer my queens marked because it lets me know whether the queen has been replaced.

Overall, we got quite a bit done and thankfully, I had anticipated it being a looong inspection. We were in the hives almost 3 hours. We managed to clean almost all of the frames in the Pink hive (bottom box 3 frames on the right still need to be cleaned). We condensed the Aqua hive to 2 deeps and took out empty frames. We marked the queens in the Pink hive and Orange hive. I spotted a bee with deformed wing so I may be doing a spring mite treatment. I should do a varroa sugar roll during my next inspection. I added medium foundationless frames to the top deep hive bodies to use for drone trapping as part of the IPM method for mite-control. The bees will draw drone comb on these frames and I can just cut it out. They will also build drone comb on the bottom of the frame because of the space left by a medium frame in a deep hive body. I’ll show you a picture when they’ve done it.

I colored the top of the frames pink to help me identify them more quickly. I had writtent the word "drone" on a frame and it has all but disappeared from the propolis, burr comb and constant foot traffic from the bees.

I colored the top of the frames pink to help me identify them more quickly. I had written the word “drone” on a frame and it has all but disappeared due to the propolis, burr comb and constant foot traffic from the bees.

On April 11th, I had moved the Purple hive queen over to the Orange hive and the Purple hive made queen cells, as planned. There were A LOT. So we moved 2 frames of capped queen cells into 2 nucs (one frame per nuc) and a frame of pollen/honey for food into each, the remainder of the queen cells remained in the Purple hive. The nucs were also each given a drawn frame and a frame of wax foundation. I’ll leave those queen cells to hatch, let the surviving queen mate and check back in a couple of weeks. The queens should emerge Saturday April 25. I would check for eggs starting May 2nd. My only concern is that the nights are cool right now (in the 30’s) and I hope it’s not going to be a problem for the developing queens.

Aqua and Pink had anywhere from 6-8 frames of brood, Orange had 4 or 5, it was most impressive. Several times I looked at frames and thought they were empty only to discover they were covered in eggs. It was insane. I’ll probably make 2 more nucs as mediums rather than deeps as the beekeepers in our area seem to be shifting to mostly mediums for the hive bodies.

Overall plan:
1. Do sugar rolls during next inspection
2. Make 2 more nucs (maybe)
3. This week I will need to add honey supers as the dandelions have started to bloom- DONE on Tuesday 4/21

As for the veil…as I proceeded to piss-off the Pink hive even more by continuing to clean frames despite their increasingly grumpy disposition, I heard a buzz that was way too close. I realized I had a bee in with me and figured I would just kill it. Well, then I looked down and realized the veil was not zippered to my jacket and suddenly I heard WAY more buzzing. CRAP! I had at least 10 bees in there and I walked quickly away from the hives (mind you I had just marked their queen and she was still sitting outside drying), I frantically tried to get the veil and jacket off. As I pulled it off the buzzing lessened somewhat until I realized I had at least 3 bees caught in my hair. Now, for those who are unaware, bees do not like being trapped. And if they feel entangled they will swiftly sting whatever is trapping them as a defense mechanism. Well, I bent over and was desperately trying to comb them out with my fingers only to feel them and hear them getting closer to my scalp–you have to understand that scalp stings are especially bad because there’s no “flesh” and so the venom will spread from the top of your head all the way down to your neck and face, it’s not pretty–I finally decided I was going to kill them instead and proceeded to slap them against my head and slap my hair between my hands. I succeeded for the most part. From getting my jacket and veil off to finally killing them, I ended up with only 2 stings: one right on the dead center of my neck and one under my shoulder blade. Not too bad when you think of it. I ran into the house, downed 800mg of Ibuprofen, put on another veil and shirt and went back out, less than 2 minutes is my guess. Thankfully my husband had put the queen back in the hive and had closed them up. Later on he said he watched me as I ran from the hives and when he saw the clothing start to come off he figured he better proceed with the hives…smart fella.

I later got a third sting (on my scalp, thank you very much) when I moved a frame that was left out by the Pink hive. I was like a magnet for the guard bees of the Pink hive, the INSTANT they saw me they actually LAUNCHED themselves at me. Anyway, I was stung but I must have kept the venom sac from pumping because I barely had a reaction. I actually combed a couple of dead bees out of my hair later on. What’s interesting is how you can easily read the “mood” of the bees. It becomes more than obvious when they’ve had enough of you, but you have to be smart enough to listen. Oh well. Nothing Benadryl and Ibuprofen can’t take care of.

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2 thoughts on “We all make mistakes

  1. Whoops! Glad you got off fairly lightly, though it must have been pretty terrifying when you realised the bees had got in. You can definitely hear when a hive is getting annoyed, the whole pitch of their buzzing changes.

  2. Pingback: We all make mistakes | Suburban Rancher | WORLD ORGANIC NEWS

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